Church of God in Christ, Prophet Elijah Hill, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,



1.4 Education

Hill graduated High School from William Jennings Bryant High School at the top of his
class in May of 1979 in South Omaha. 
[21] He was one of eight Senior High School students out of 600 of his classmates the only African American that qualified to have taken College calculus in math at Bryant High. He attended University of Nebraska at Lincoln but dropped out of College because of lack of finances.  [22]

In 1984, Hill attended Randall’s School of Real Estate and took several classes to take the exam to get his
Real Estate License in the State of Nebraska, and he became the eight African American 
[23] to receive their license he worked at Northside Reality in northwest Omaha[24] While doing research on his father side of the family he learned that his great uncle on his father side named William Moses Sones was one of the first African American’s to receive his Real Estate license in the State of Nebraska.  [25]

The founder of the Great Plains Black Museum located in Omaha, Nebraska named Bertha Callaway told Rev. Hill that his uncle helped her establish that museum and his picture had been on the wall of the entrance of this museum for years. 
[26]
Hill spoke to my Real Estate office senior broker Al Grice, for Northside Reality
[27] and shared with him about him being my uncle. He told me that Mr. Sones had given him the finances during the 70’s economic crash; he funded his business because he wanted to see African American Real Estate business thrive, so he named it Northside Reality which was the name my uncle originally named his Real Estate firm in 1921 when he first moved here from Arkansas. [28]
After relocating to Kansas City, Missouri in 1996 he later, return to school at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Kansas completing his Bachelors and two Master degrees a Master’s in Business Administration in 2000
[29] and the second Masters in Educational Technology in 2001.He is currently a doctoral candidate at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona with his area of graduate study in Organizational Leadership.  [30]

1.5 Military
On November 8, 1978,
Hill joined the United States Marine Corps reserves
[31] after graduating High School in order to assist him with paying for his college education. He attended boot camp in San Diego, California from May to August [32] graduating at the top of his class with a certification to be an air conditioning and refrigeration mechanic on July 3, 1980.  [33]

​​​​​


In 1985, Richard Kellin died in police custody after an altercation with several police Omaha police officers.  City Councilman Fred Conley and Rev. Elijah Hill pushed for a citywide petition drive
[84] to force a grand jury hearing of Kellin’s case in his wrongful death. The petition drive on December 12, 1986, the Omaha World Herald called it “One for the history books”, because this was the first time in Omaha’s history that the citizen had signed 13, 299 valid voter registration signatures to call a grand jury hearing against the Omaha Police Department. Hill‘s church membership was an important factor in the success of the petitions going beyond the black community to the greater Omaha community.  [85]
The former Mayor P.J. Morgan of Omaha Nebraska appointed Rev. Elijah Hill 1993 to be a member of the City of Omaha Nebraska’s local Landmarks Commission. His duties were to participate in public hearings in the City of Omaha’s place of business to oversee the City’s inventory of 100 Million dollars’ worth of historic properties. 
[86]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1984, Rev. Elijah L. Hill at 24 years old is interviewed by Lynn religious editor for The Omaha World Herald at his newly formed church in North Omaha on 24th and Lake Street.

​​
After the Omaha World Herald newspaper his media exposure increased in the Om


aha, Nebraska area as a public figure, as a young minister in his twenties he became one of the most news worthy young African American ministers in the Omaha community in the 80’s and 90’s.  [49] With Rev. Hill becoming involved with the Cox Cable public access channel, and producing his own television show when public access was not known to be free for area resident Hill had the longest running television show in the Omaha area. [50]

​​​​​​​​​​​


Seminar Speaker

Hill develop curriculum for classes for a national training institute in Memphis, Tennessee The O. T. Jones Institute from 1994 to 2003 on the topic of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason teaching on his historic leadership secrets. The annual class is developed for leaders within a national organization that seek for more information surrounding their corporate culture. The class takes place during an annual convention, and attendees come from throughout the United States and the world to take the courses that center around their areas of interest. [195]

Elder Hill, has spoken for the National Churches of God in Christ Elder’s Council as a seminar speaker in 2012 he spoke on the topic of “Equipping the Church of God in Christ Elder being an effective Churchman”. In 2013, he spoke on the topic of “Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s historical political theology on religious liberty is the model for peaceful proactive solutions for COGIC Elders today in our contemporary society.” [196]
Elder Hill as a Church of God in Christ minister was a part of the COGIC Scholars organization in the Church of God in Christ organization. In 2006, he presented his book to be critiqued by other scholars with the organization his biography on Mother Lizzie Robinson called, “Women Come Alive,”  [197] and in 2007 he presented his book on the biography of Bishop William J. Seymour called, “ The Azusa Street Revival Wrapped in Swaddling Clothes, Lying in a Manger.” [198]

Hill contribution to Pentecostal history is that he wrote from an Afro-Centric perspective that Euro-American Pentecostal write had left unwritten about surrounding Bishop William J. Seymour and Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s life stories. [199]  His book Women Come Alive was written from a perspective that left off sexist perspective that were a part of the Church of God in Christ traditional male perspective giving her that rightful significance as a globe African American religious leader.  [200] His book the Triumph of the Black Church on the biography of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason the founder of the Church of God in Christ organization, he was the first to write about the 1917-1921 FBI files in Washington on the life of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason that uncovered his contribution to Pre-Civil Rights in America.  [201]

He ordained white and black ministers in the early Pentecostal Movement and addressed civil rights during a wartime era. Mason continued this prophetic purpose of the original Pentecostal Movement at Azusa Street Mission that was about the democratization of all cultures no matter what their race or creed. Bishop Mason collaborated with one of his white followers creating what they called, “Philosophy of God: the Brotherhood of Man Through the Holy Scriptures.” [202]

Elder Hill in 2003 to 2005 was a seminar speaker in The Potters Institute at Bishop T.D. Jakes, The Potter’s House in Dallas, Texas; he was an Old Testament teacher on the books of the Old Testament. He also wrote curriculum for their ministry on the topic of “Understanding the Prophetic”. [203]

On July of 2012, Hill presented his doctoral dissertation as a doctoral learner before hundreds of fellow students after he won selection as an emerging scholar-practitioner amongst his peers. His abstract is chosen for publication in Grand Canyon University’s Canyon Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in August of 2013. His was his first academic journal publication in his twenty-year writing career. [204]

National Prophetic Voice

That day the Lord spoke to him to go over to Pastor Vernon Richardson's house the national church was to come back to Omaha, Nebraska to say who would be the Bishop, and the Lord told me to go to his house and let him know he would be the Bishop of Nebraska in the next eight months. The Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford came back in eight months and selected Bishop Vernon Richardson the Bishop of Nebraska just as God had said.  [205]  In 1999, Elder Hill was on a five day fast and sent Presiding Bishop Chandler David Owens a prophetic letter that he was sick in his body, but that God was going to heal him completely. It was later in 2000 that Presiding Bishop Owens acknowledges he was sick and after his surgery, the cancer was completely healed.  [206]  The accuracy of the prophecy for Presiding Bishop Owens blessed him so he decided when Elder Hill asked what would he like him to do he endorsed his book on biblical prophecy called, “The Unsealing of the Last Things.” Elder Hill, wrote several prophetic letters to Presiding Bishop Owens, Presiding Bishop G.E. Patterson, and Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake that he kept in secret, since the letter had to do with future direction for the national church.  [207]

In 2001 during 911 Elder Hill shared a prophetic letter with the President of the United States revealing a strategy for then President George Bush to deal with future attacks on America. When the national had an Antraxes issue Elder Hill shared spiritually with the President how to utilize herbal composition to counteract its harmful effects. Elder Hill, also shared his book the “Unsealing of the Last Things with then President Bush to look to the religious community for direction in dealing with the Mideast before making this military decision. The President called for several religious leaders (which included then the late Presiding Bishop G. E. Patterson) to come to Washington to help him understand the biblical approach to the Mideast. The President sent back correspondence to Elder Hill appreciating his input during 911, and the insight that he gave during that target time in America. [208]

In 2001 Elder Hill, wrote a prophetic letter to the then new Presiding Bishop Gilbert Earl Patterson on direction in leading the church, and he shared with him to include the history of the church sharing ten ways that it could be done. Presiding Bishop Patterson quickly implemented an idea then produced Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s prayer along with his during the next April Call meeting of the Church of God in Christ. He later implemented the Old Time Way songs which became success even to all of Christendom in America. [209]  In 2007, Elder Hill, shared a prophetic letter to the entire Church of God in Christ prophesying that Bishop Charles E. Blake 30 days before the Holy Convocation was God’s will to be the next Presiding Bishop of the COGIC, and it came to past thirty days later.  [210]

In 2003 Elder Hill, prophesied that Bishop T.D. Jakes would in the future begin to develop other Potter’s House that would evolve from his ministry, and five years later, he has implemented what was said.   [211]  It was in October of 2010 Rev. Elijah L. Hill was invited to the White House by Joshua DuBois then the national director of Faith Based Services for the African American Leadership Summit. [212]  On January 2012 a year before it occurred Elder Hill, prophesied on Facebook that the current President of the United States Barack Obama would win a second term, and in November of 2012 when many in the media as well as the religious sector stated it would not happen it came to past.  [213]

 

References

  1. Certificate of Birth, Department of Health Bureau of Vital Statistics, Issue date (March 20, 1978), “Certificate of Birth,” Elijah Leonard Hill, Omaha, Nebraska.
  2. D. Law, Omaha Public School Teacher, (June 9, 1972), Franklin School Omaha, The Citizenship Award given to Elijah Hill from the staff of Franklin school.
  3. "Elijah Hill, Class of 1979 - Bryan High School - Classmates". classmates.com.
  4. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church”, Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656, P.g. 176.
  5. Ibid, Pg. 176.
  6. PTWWN SHOW w Prophet Elijah Hill. YouTube. 18 November 2014.
  7. Nebraska Furniture Mart. "Our History - Nebraska Furniture Mart". nfm.com.
  8. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church”, Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656, P.g. 176.
  9. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church,”  , Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656, Pg. 177.
  10. WhyAtlantaLive7000combin. YouTube. 19 September 2014.
  11. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church”, Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656, P.g. 177.
  12. Ibid. P.g. 178.
  13. Ibid. P.g. 178.
  14. Ibid. P.g. 178.
  15. Ibid. P.g. 178.
  16. Ibid. P.g. 179.
  17. Ibid. P.g. 180.
  18. Ibid. P.g. 179.
  19. University of Nebraska Medical Center, (July 1978). “Record Number of CETA Youths Here: article surrounding Elijah Hill”, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Dispatch Magazine.
  20. Dispatch Magazine. Pg. 8.
  21. Bryant Senior High School Yearbook, (May, 1979). “Elijah Hill’s Senior High School Year Book,” Omaha, Nebraska, Bryant Senior High Publisher. Retrieved September 15, 2015, http://www.classmates.com/yearbooks/Bryan-High-School/247991?page=30
  22. Al Papik, Director of Admissions, The University of Nebraska-Lincoln office of Admission, (August 1979), “Certificate of Admission of acceptance of Elijah L. Hill, Lincoln, Nebraska.
  23. Zerschling, Lynn (July 14, 1984). Energetic Pastor “Pulls Them off The Street,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  24. "Northside Real Estate". bbb.org.
  25. "SearchQuarry.com". William Moses Sones searchquarry.com.
  26. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_Calloway
  27. "Northside Real Estate". bbb.org.
  28. Hill, Elijah (June 14, 2004). Hill & Murphy Family Tree, Page 8, Ancestry.com Press.  Retrieved September 15, 2015, http://www.mycanvas.com/products/family-history-books/
  29. The Call Newspaper, (March 14, 2002), “Banneker Upgrades With Staff, Computer Technology, Kansas City, Missouri, Page 5.
  30. Canyon Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, Grand Canyon University, (August 2013), “Graduate Issue: Emerging Scholar-Practitioners”. Elijah Hill, Doctoral Learner abstract publication, “Effective practices for historical preservation: The Largest African American Pentecostal Organization’s contribution To Pre-Civil Rights.”
  31. A. E. Johnson, Recruiter, United States Marine Corps, (November 8, 1978), “Certificate of Acceptance of Elijah Leonard Hill accepted enlistment in Marine Corps Reserves Office, Omaha, Nebraska.
  32. United States Marine Corps Diego California, (August, 1979).  “Elijah L. Hill’s Graduating Class for Boot camp United States Marines,” United States Marines San Diego, California Publisher. 
  33. J. G. Dixion, Colonel & Commander, The United States Marine Corps School of Engineer Camp Le Jeune, NC. (July 3, 1980), “Certificate of Completion for Elijah L. Hill in basic refrigeration Mechanic, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
  34. Capt. E.E. Hesse, (October 3, 1982), “United States Marine Corps Meritorious Mast Certificate of Award,” For Corporal Elijah L. Hill, Omaha, NE.
  35. C.S. Bishop, Jr, Brigadier General United States Marine Corps,(November 7, 1984), “Certifies the Honorable Discharge of Elijah L. Hill from the United States Marine Corps, Omaha, Nebraska.
  36. Zerschling, Lynn (July 14, 1984). Energetic Pastor “Pulls Them off The Street,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  37. "Holy Ghost Temple". netministries.org
  38. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church,”  Page 5-6, Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656.
  39. Zerschling, Lynn (July 14, 1984). Energetic Pastor “Pulls Them off The Street,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  40. The Call Newspaper, (March 14, 2002), “Banneker Upgrades With Staff, Computer Technology, Kansas City, Missouri, Page 5.
  41. "941350". kcmo.org.
  42. University of Nebraska Medical Center, (July 1978). “Record Number of CETA Youths Here: article surrounding Elijah Hill”, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Dispatch Magazine.
  43. Myers Funeral Home Notice, (June, 1994), “In Loving Memory of Lenora Hawkins,” Pastor Elijah L. Hill, Officiating, Omaha, NE, Myers Funeral Home Publisher.
  44. "Nebraska Athletic Commission". nebraska.gov.
  45. "Bill Cunningham  : TALKERS.COM". talkers.com.
  46. Omaha Star Newspaper Weekly, (July 1984). “A New, Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Celebration.” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8.
  47. Ibid. Pg. 8.
  48. Zerschling, Lynn (July 14, 1984). Energetic Pastor “Pulls Them off The Street,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 8, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  49. Ibid. Pg. 8.
  50. Smith, Rudy (July 6, 1990).  “Gospel Television Growing in Omaha,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  51. Collison, Kevin (December 12, 1986). “Drive Seen As One For The History Books: Kellin Probe Signatures Turned In,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  52. Ibid. Front Page
  53. Schinker, Nick (February 24, 1987). “Kellin’s Widow Among First Called Before Grand Jury,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 4, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  54. Omaha Star Newspaper, (July 4, 1985), “Operation Soul Food,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 5.
  55. Ibid. Page 5
  56. Smith, Rudy (May 10, 1990).  “Minority Cable Network To Air Beginning June 3,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  57. Smith, Rudy (July 6, 1990).  “Gospel Television Growing in Omaha,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper, "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  58. Smith, Rudy (May 10, 1990).  “Minority Cable Network To Air Beginning June 3,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  59. Smith, Rudy (July 6, 1990).  “Gospel Television Growing in Omaha,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper, "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  60. Fred Coney, Omaha City Councilman, (December 10, 1991), Submitted City Omaha City Council Resolution, “That Rev. Elijah L. Hill introduced the first Gospel Programming on Cable Television for the African American Religious community.
  61. Morgan, P.J., Mayor of the City of Omaha, Nebraska, (December 13, 1991), Proclamation for Pastor Elijah L. Hill acknowledging of Omaha as the Gospel Capitol of Nebraska and Rev. Hill hosting Gospel Music Festival Week on July 5, 1992.
  62. Nelson, Benjamin, Governor of State of Nebraska, (July 10, 1992), “State of Nebraska Official Proclamation surrounding Rev. Elijah L. Hill hosting the first festival of Omaha Gospel Music Festival.
  63. Morgan, P.J., Mayor of the City of Omaha, Nebraska, (December 13, 1991), Proclamation for Pastor Elijah L. Hill acknowledging of Omaha as the Gospel Capitol of Nebraska and Rev. Hill hosting Gospel Music Festival Week on July 5, 1992.
  64. Hill, Elijah L., (January 27, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for Landmark Designation of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s daughter’s Home, address 2864 Corby St,” Case File Number H1-92-5. http://landmark.cityofomaha.org/lizzie-robinson-house/
  65. Hill, Elijah L., (January 27, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for Landmark Designation of Robinson Memorial Church of God in Christ, address 2318 N. 26th St,” Case File Number H1-92-4, Retrieved October 14, 2013, http://landmark.cityofomaha.org/robinson-memorial-church-of-god-in-christ-site-only/
  66. Morgan, P.J., Mayor of the City of Omaha, (February 27, 1992), City Proclamation acknowledging Rev. Elijah L. Hill requesting that Mother Lizzie Robinson Memorial Day be a day of celebration in Omaha, NE.
  67. Hall, David (April 1992), “Omaha Remembers Mother Robinson,” Memphis, TN, Page 2, The Whole Truth Newspaper.
  68. Hill, Elijah L. &  Omaha City Planning Department (June 9, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for National Register of Historic Places  Nomination of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s last home as Significant to America’s history,” Property approved by United States Department of the Interior National Park Service on February 25, 1993. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lizzie_Robinson_House
  69. Friend, Joseph, President of City Council Omaha, Nebraska, (November 10, 1992), City Council Resolution Legislative Chamber, “Mayor of Omaha appointing Rev. Elijah L. Hill as serving on the Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to serve for three year term.
  70. Brennan, Joe (August 5, 1992), “Council Says: Here‘s to You Mrs. Robinson,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 15., Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  71. Ibid. Page 15
  72. Omaha Star Newspaper Weekly, (November 1993), “Rev. Hill Appointed to Landmarks Commission,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 6.
  73. Walsh, Jannet (August 5, 1992), “Stretch of Erskine Now Lizzie Robinson Avenue,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 7, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  74. Hall, David (April 1993), “State of Nebraska’s Governor’s Recognition Award,” Memphis, TN, Page 4, The Whole Truth Newspaper.
  75. Tri-State Defender, (October 7, 1992), “Sign of the Times: Street Honors L. Robinson,” Memphis, TN, Page 6A
  76. E. Benjamin Nelson, Governor of State of Nebraska, (February 20, 1993), Issuance of the Governor’s Recognition Award to Rev. Elijah L. Hill for his Civic achievement towards the Renaissance and Preservation of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s history, Lincoln, Nebraska State Capitol.  
  77. Smith, Rudy (May 10, 1990).  “Minority Cable Network To Air Beginning June 3,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  78. Smith, Rudy (July 6, 1990).  “Gospel Television Growing in Omaha,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  79. Morgan, P.J., Mayor of the City of Omaha, Nebraska, (December 13, 1991), Proclamation for Pastor Elijah L. Hill acknowledging of Omaha as the Gospel Capitol of Nebraska and Rev. Hill hosting Gospel Music Festival Week on July 5, 1992.
  80. Nelson, Benjamin, Governor of State of Nebraska, (July 10, 1992), “State of Nebraska Official Proclamation surrounding Rev. Elijah L. Hill hosting the first festival of Omaha Gospel Music Festival.
  81. United States Of America Federal Communication Commission, (May 13, 1994), From Keith A Larson, Chief, LPTV Branch Video Services Division, “Granting Catherine Hill, call sign K34DT,  for Omaha, Nebraska/Lincoln permit file # BMPTTL-9433OJC, Modification of Construction Permit for extension of completion date, Washington, D.C.
  82. Smith, Rudy (July 6, 1990).  “Gospel Television Growing in Omaha,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page. Metro Star Times Newspaper.
  83. Omaha Star Newspaper, (July 4, 1985), “Operation Soul Food,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 5.
  84. Collison, Kevin (December 12, 1986). “Drive Seen As One For The History Books: Kellin Probe Signatures Turned In,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  85. Collison, Kevin (December 12, 1986). “Drive Seen As One For The History Books: Kellin Probe Signatures Turned In,” Omaha, Nebraska, Front Page, Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  86. Omaha Star Newspaper Weekly, (November 1993), “Rev. Hill Appointed to Landmarks Commission,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 6.
  87. Ibid. Page 6.
  88. Brennan, Joe (August 5, 1992), “Council Says: Here‘s to You Mrs. Robinson,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 15., Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  89. Hill, Elijah L., Chairperson Commission (December 15, 1993), “Letter from Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to City of Omaha Law Department to then City Attorney Mary Elliston to inquire about commission rules of order, Omaha, Nebraska.
  90. Brennan, Joe (Aril 9, 1994), “Preservation Group to Make Peony Park Recommendation”. Omaha World Herald Newspaper, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 31.
  91. Brennan, Joe (March 29, 1994), “Saving Peony Impossible, Peschio Says: Designating It a Landmark Called Futile,” Omaha, Nebraska, and Page. 11. Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  92. Janovy, Jena (April 12, 1994), “Peony Park Fail to Get Landmark Status,” Omaha World Herald Newspaper, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 18.
  93.  Elijah Hill. YouTube.  
  94. National Prophetic Voice
  95. National Prophetic Voice
  96. Julia McCord, (September 21, 1991), Bishop Urges Church of God in Christ to Return to Roots: Bishop Says Omaha Key To His Church,” Omaha World Herald, Omaha, Nebraska ,Page 66.
  97. "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  98. "Bishop C. H. Mason and the Roots of the Church of God in Christ: Ithiel Clemmons: 9781562294519: Amazon.com: Books". amazon.com.
  99. http://www.elijahlhill.com/books-authored.html
  100. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church”, Createspace Publisher. P.g. 9.
  101. Hall, David (April 1993), “State of Nebraska’s Governor’s Recognition Award,” Memphis, TN, Page 4, The Whole Truth Newspaper.
  102. "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  103. "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  104. Omaha Star Newspaper Weekly, (November 1993), “Rev. Hill Appointed to Landmarks Commission,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 6.
  105. E. Benjamin Nelson, Governor of Nebraska, (February 20, 1993), Letter to Rev. Elijah L. Hill congratulating being a recipient of the Nebraska Governor’s Recognition Award, Lincoln, NE.
  106. Hill, Elijah L., Chairperson Commission (December 15, 1993), “Letter from Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to City of Omaha Law Department to then City Attorney Mary Elliston to inquire about commission rules of order, Omaha, Nebraska.
  107. Hall, David (June, 1993), “The First & Youngest Black To Chair Commission,” Memphis, TN, Page 11, The Whole Truth Newspaper.
  108. Brennan, Joe (March 29, 1994), “Saving Peony Impossible, Peschio Says: Designating It a Landmark Called Futile,” Omaha, Nebraska, and Page. 11. Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  109. Brinson, Temia, (April 2013). “Rev. Elijah L. Hill’s Interview, “The Lost Soul of Black Religion”, Pg. 10, Rejoice Magazine.
  110. "ResearchCOGICPhotos". cogicmuseum.
  111. Brinson, Temia, (March 20, 2014). “Booking Engagement’s for Rev. Elijah L. Hill”, Pg. 4, Rejoice Magazine.
  112. "Mother Lizzie Robinson / Rev. Elijah L. Hill Collection Deposited at FPHC". Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
  113. Introduction of Rev. Elijah Hill by Dr. Bryon Klaus & Darrin Rodgers. YouTube. 8 February 2014.
  114. Introduction of Rev. Elijah Hill by Dr. Bryon Klaus & Darrin Rodgers. YouTube. 8 February 2014.
  115. Hill, Elijah L. &  Omaha City Planning Department (June 9, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for National Register of Historic Places  Nomination of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s last home as Significant to America’s history,” Property approved by United States Department of the Interior National Park Service on February 25, 1993. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lizzie_Robinson_House
  116. "Encounter - Online Journal". agseminary.edu.
  117. Hill, Elijah L. &  Omaha City Planning Department (June 9, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for National Register of Historic Places  Nomination of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s last home as Significant to America’s history,” Property approved by United States Department of the Interior National Park Service on February 25, 1993. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lizzie_Robinson_House
  118. Julia McCord, (September 21, 1991), Bishop Urges Church of God in Christ to Return to Roots: Bishop Says Omaha Key To His Church,” Omaha World Herald, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 66.
  119. Hall, David, (April 1993), “State of Nebraska’s Governor’s Recognition Award,” The Whole Truth Newspaper, Memphis, TN, Page 4.
  120. Charles H. Pleas, Fifty Years of Achievement: Church of God in Christ” Privately Published: Kansas City, KS, 1955, Page 12.
  121. Hill, Elijah, Women Come Alive, Arlington, Texas, P.O. Box 181937, (Independently Published), May, 2006, Pg. 11.
  122. Ibid. Pg. 26.
  123. Charles H. Pleas, Fifty Years of Achievement: Church of God in Christ” Privately Published: Kansas City, KS, 1955, Page 12.
  124. McCord, Julia (September 21, 1991), Bishop Urges Church of God in Christ to Return to Roots: Bishop Says Omaha Key To His Church,” Omaha World Herald, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 66.
  125. Julia McCord, (September 21, 1991), Bishop Urges Church of God in Christ to Return to Roots: Bishop Says Omaha Key To His Church,” Omaha World Herald, Omaha, Nebraska, Page 66.
  126. Hall, David (April 1992), “Omaha Remembers Mother Robinson,” The Whole Truth Newspaper, Memphis, TN, Page 2.
  127. "COGICblog". cogicmuseum.
  128. Brennan, Joe (August 5, 1992), “Council Says: Here‘s to You Mrs. Robinson,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 15., Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  129. Hill, Elijah L., (January 27, 1992), “Public Application to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for Landmark Designation of Robinson Memorial Church of God in Christ, address 2318 N. 26th St,” Case File Number H1-92-4, Retrieved October 14, 2013, http://www.ci.omaha.ne.us/planning/landmarks/alphabetical-listing/robinson-memorial-church-of-god-in-christ.
  130. Brennan, Joe (August 5, 1992), “Council Says: Here‘s to You Mrs. Robinson,” Omaha, Nebraska, Page 15., Omaha World Herald Newspaper.
  131. "Important COGIC Collection: Nearly 500 Early Photographs Now Online at iFPHC.org". Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
  132. "Encounter - Online Journal". agseminary.edu.
  133. Lizzie Robinson 1.wmv. YouTube. 7 May 2010.
  134. "AGTS News: Watch the dedication of the historic Mother Lizzie Robinson/Rev. Elijah L. Hill collection at AGTS". agts.edu.
  135. "Mother Lizzie Robinson and women in the COGIC and AG : AGTV". ag.org.
  136. Moore, Linda, (April 5, 2014). “Renovated National Civil Rights Museum Opens With Prayers, Doves, Broken Chains”, Memphis Commercial Appeal Newspaper.
  137. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church,” Pg. 16,  Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656.
  138. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2015). “The 1917 FBI Files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason,” Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1512090543.

  139.  

  140. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2015). “The 1917 FBI Files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason,” Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1512090543.
  141. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in christ organization is similar to themes in the american civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  142. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church,” Pg. 17,  Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656.
  143. Ibid. Pg. 17.
  144. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American Civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Current Student Dissertation.
  145. Chism, Jonathan, (2013). “The Saints Go Marching”: Black Pentecostal Critical Consciousness and the Political Protest Activism of Pastors and Leaders in the Church of God in Christ in the Civil Rights Era.” Pneuma, the Journal of the Society for Pentecostal Studies, Vol. 35, Number 3, Pg. 424-443.
  146. Darrin Rodgers ask Rev. Elijah Hill compare COGIC civil Rights vs. Civil Rights in America. YouTube. 4 February 2014.
  147. Part5The SeditiousAct1918PresidentWilsonViolaFreePressRev KPRTInterview. YouTube. 9 February 2014.
  148. Schlabach, T.F. & Hughes, R.T. (1987). Proclaim Peace: Christian Pacifism from Unexpected Quarters. Illinois: University of Illinois Press Pg. 5.
  149. Rev. Elijah Hill KPRT Interview Mason goes to Washington, D.C.,. YouTube. 9 February 2014.
  150. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American Civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  151. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American Civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  152. Darrin Rodgers ask Rev. Elijah Hill about the accusation the Bishop Mason was a German Spy. YouTube. 4 February 2014.
  153. Darrin Rodgers ask Rev. Elijah Hill compare COGIC civil Rights vs. Civil Rights in America. YouTube. 4 February 2014.
  154. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church,” Pg. 65, Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656.
  155. Ibid. Pg. 103.
  156. Rev. Elijah Hill KPRT Interview Mason goes to Washington, D.C.,. YouTube. 9 February 2014.
  157. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American Civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  158. Hill, E., (2015), A historical case study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American Civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  159. Professor Self ask question of Rev. Elijah Hill on Bishop Mason's 1894 Cultural Sensitivity. YouTube. 4 February 2014.
  160. "Books Authored". Hill's Communication.
  161. "Encounter - Online Journal". agseminary.edu
  162. Israel, Adrienne, (July 2006). Book Review “Women Come Alive,” By Dr. Adrienne Israel, professor of History and Intercultural Studies at Guilford College, The Whole Truth Magazine, Pg. 15.
  163. http://www.elijahlhill.com/books-authored.html Book Reviews.
  164. http://www.elijahlhill.com/books-authored.html Book Reviews.
  165. Lizzie Robinson 1.wmv. YouTube. 7 May 2010.
  166. COGIC history 2.mpg. YouTube. 8 May 2010.
  167. MasonFinalDVD. YouTube. 10 July 2013.
  168. Women Come Alive 1.wmv. YouTube. 7 May 2010.
  169. Introduction of Rev. Elijah Hill by Dr. Bryon Klaus & Darrin Rodgers. YouTube. 8 February 2014.
  170. "Mother Lizzie Robinson and women in the COGIC and AG : AGTV". ag.org.
  171. WebsiteAsseblyGodPresentation. YouTube. 26 May 2013.
  172. Professor Self ask question of Rev. Elijah Hill on Bishop Mason's 1894 Cultural Sensitivity. YouTube. 4 February 2014.
  173. "COGIC Scholars Fellowship to Meet at Holy Convocation, Nov 6-10, 2013". Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
  174. Whitehead, James, (June, 2008). “Elijah Hill Writes Three Months Lessons Church of God in Christ Publishing House, Memphis, TN, Young People’s Willing Worker Quarterly National Church of God in Christ Publishing House.
  175. University of Nebraska Medical Center,  IMG_0012 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yGudmT  Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  176. University of Nebraska Medical Center Summer youth Award, 1978 IMG_0027 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/xJRDa6  Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  177. 1984, United States Marines Rev. Elijah Hill highest award, IMG_0048 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yGwtpV   Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  178. 1988, Omaha, NE, Rev. Elijah Hill on Mayor's Commission for MLK IMG_0039 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yDs2TL  Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  179. Mayor P. J. Morgan by proclamation Rev. Elijah Hill Omaha proclaiming July 8, 1992IMG_0036 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/xJJ6D5  Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  180. Omaha named Gospel Capitol of Nebraska Rev. Elijah Hill 1993IMG_0038 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yFKAac
  181. Youngest Black to Chair Commission 1993 FirstBlackLandMarkWholeTruth10web #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yFQsNi
  182. 1992 by Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford proclamation Rev. Elijah Hill, ProclaJford #flickr https://flic.kr/p/xLczmu
  183. 1993, Governor Ben Nelson, Award Rev. Hill GoverAward1991 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/ysFasB
  184. 1994, National Trust Historic Preservation awarded Rev. Hill PressreleaNationaTrust1 #flickr https://flic.kr/p/yHXFhr
  185. The Call Newspaper, (March 14, 2002), “Banneker Upgrades With Staff, Computer Technology, Kansas City, Missouri, Page 5, Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  186. The Call Newspaper, (March 14, 2002), “Banneker Upgrades With Staff, Computer Technology, Kansas City, Missouri, Page 5, Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  187. The Call Newspaper, (March 14, 2002), “Banneker Upgrades With Staff, Computer Technology, Kansas City, Missouri, Page 5, Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  188. The Call Newspaper, (April 25, 2002), “Student, Teachers Visit State Capitol,” Kansas City, Missouri, Page 10, Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  189. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  190. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  191. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  192. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  193. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  194. "Rev Elijah Hill my letter to Governor Entertainment Technology Center". constantcontact.com.
  195. "Elijah L Hill - In Atlanta, GA, Rev. Elijah Hill at... - Facebook".
  196. O.T. Jones Institute Speaker
  197. Speaking National Elder’s Council Rev. Hill
  198. Smith, Raynard,  (November 6, 2006), Elder Elijah L. Hill, Presenter Book Discussion at Holy Convocation, “Women Come Alive,” Biography of Mother Lizzie Robinson, AIM Convention, Houston, Texas, Page 1, Advocate COGIC Scholars Magazine.
  199. "COGIC Scholars Fellowship Academic Forum". Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
  200. "COGIC Scholars Fellowship Academic Forum". Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
  201. Hill, Elijah, Women Come Alive, Arlington, Texas, P.O. Box 181937, (Independently Published), May, 2006, Pg. 5.
  202. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of The Black Church”, Createspace Publisher. P.g. 115.
  203. Ibid. P.g. 93.
  204. http://www.elijahlhill.com/personal-testimonials.html
  205. Canyon Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, Grand Canyon University, (August 2013), “Graduate Issue: Emerging Scholar-Practitioners”. Elijah Hill, Doctoral Learner abstract publication, “Effective practices for historical preservation: The Largest African American Pentecostal Organization’s contribution To Pre-Civil Rights.”
  206. Hill, Elijah, Women Come Alive, Arlington, Texas, P.O. Box 181937, (Independently Published), May, 2006, Pg. 181.
  207. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  208. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  209. President George W. Bush, (December 14, 2001), Letter to Prophet Elijah L. Hill, appreciating his input on 911, Picture of post card from White House, Retrieved October 14, 2013. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  210. President George W. Bush, (December 14, 2001), Letter to Prophet Elijah L. Hill, appreciating his input on 911, Picture of post card from White House, Retrieved October 14, 2013. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  211. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  212. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  213. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html
  214. http://www.elijahlhill.com/national-prophetic-voice.html




Works cited

  1.  Hill, Elijah, (2015), A historicaase study on the pre-civil rights themes in the church of god in Christ organization is similar to themes in the American civil rights movement, Grand Canyon University Student Dissertation.
  2. Chism, Jonathan, (2013). “The Saints Go Marching”: Black Pentecostal Critical Consciousness and the Political Protest Activism of Pastors and Leaders in the Church of God in Christ in the Civil Rights Era.” Pneuma, the Journal of the Society for Pentecostal Studies, Vol. 35, Number 3, Pg. 424-443.
  3. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2013). “The Triumph of the Black Church,” Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1489500656.
  4. Hill, Elijah, (May, 2015). “The 1917 FBI Files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason,” Createspace Publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1512090543.
  5. Hill, Elijah (June 14, 2004). Hill & Murphy Family Tree, Page 8, Ancestry.com Press. Retrieved September 15, 2015, http://www.mycanvas.com/products/family-history-books/
  6. Hill, Elijah, Women Come Alive, Arlington, Texas, P.O. Box 181937, (Independently Published), May, 2006. ISBN-13: 978-0971928817.
  7. Bryant Senior High School Yearbook, (May, 1979). “Elijah Hill’s Senior High School Year Book,” Omaha, Nebraska, Bryant Senior High Publisher. Retrivied September 15, 2015, http://www.classmates.com/yearbooks/Bryan-High-School/247991?page=30
  8. United States Marine Corps Diego California, (August, 1979).“Elijah L. Hill’s Graduating Class for Boot camp United States Marines,” United States Marines San Diego, California Publisher.
  9. Schlabach, T.F. & Hughes, R.T. (1987). Proclaim Peace: Christian Pacifism from Unexpected Quarters. Illinois: University of Illinois Press.
  10. Charles H. Pleas, Fifty Years of Achievement: Church of God in Christ” Privately Published: Kansas City, KS, 1955.
  11. James Courts, The History and Life Work of Bishop C.H. Mason, Privately Published: Memphis, TN, 1919.


 











 

 

  1. Angels
  2. Who was Satan in Heaven and his Earthly Works
  3. Who was Christ Before he Came to Earth.
  4. The Unsealing of the Last Things (Bible Prophecy
  5. Women Come Alive (The historical biography of Lizzie Robinson
  6. The Azusa Street Revival Wrapped in Swaddling Clothes lying in a Manger” (Biography of William J. Seymour)Here is a link.
  7. Women Come Alive Historic Photo Album
  8. COGIC Bishop’s Photo Album The Great Cloud of Witnesses
  9. The Triumph of The Black Church (Biography of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason
  10. The 1917 FBI Files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason

In 1917, Bishop Charles Harrison Mason sends a telegram to Washington, D.C. to President Wilson to discuss conscientious objector 1st Amendment Constitution Invited to White House. Bishop C.H. Mason is invited to the white House to speak with the War Department surrounding discussion of religious freedoms and liberties surrounding the May 18, 1917, The Selective Service Act or Draft Law.  [155]
Rev. Hill’s research FBI investigation reveals the four similar themes like; presidential interaction, passive resistance, white, and black interracial collaboration, and challenging American jurisprudence that were similar themes within the later Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.  [156]
Mason had essentially accomplished in America what Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi had done in India, by developing a non-violent and pacifistic philosophy. Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s non-violent and passive approach the philosophy of God was taken from Hebrews 12:14, which states, “Follow peace with all men, holiness without no man shall see the Lord.” Mason collaborated with one of his white followers creating what they called, Philosophy of God: The Brotherhood of Man through the Holy Scriptures. [157]
Rev. Hill, on March 2013 at the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary presents most of the above mentioned Pre-Civil Rights history material in a presentation called, “Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s impact of his Pentecostal leadership on America’s jurisprudence from 1896-1922.  [158]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


L-R, Mayor P.J. Morgan, Rev. Elijah L. Hill, Bishop Vernon Richardson, Chairman of City Council Joe Friend, Sister Lucas,  April 1992, Omaha, NE Mayor of Omaha's Office


Omaha Community Public Figure/Civic Achievements

His first media exposure was at the age of 18 years old the University of Nebraska Medical Center Dispatch Magazine on July 1978, wrote an article surrounding his ability as a summer youth as a High School student doing graduate level work while working in the CETA Youths in Omaha, Nebraska. 
[42]
Hill’s ministry as a young minister in the predominately North Omaha’s African American community extended mainly to them, but his exposure extended to the greater Omaha community at larger when he preached a funeral of the daughter
 [43]
of a famous boxer trainer Leonard Hawkins called “Hawk,” a Great Plains Hall of Fame Amateur Boxing Trainer who was known by white and black prominent individuals in the Omaha community.  [44] They heard Hill speak, and were amazed at his articulation at his age. One of the two white individuals that heard him was Bill Cunningham  [45] at the time then manager of Sweet 98 FM. Cunningham was so impressed with Hill’s speaking ability he turned down the Roman Catholic Arch Bishop of the state of Nebraska to invited Rev. Hill at 24 years old an African American young minister to conduct the invocation at Mutual of Omaha and Sweet 98’s Old-Fashion Fourth of July Celebration, which was held at Rosenblatt Stadium with 20,000 attendees[46]

​​Guest Speaker Assembly of God WorldHeadquarters October 4, 2013

Awards & Acknowledgements


                Elijah L. Hill

Alma mater
MidAmerica Nazarene University (B.A.) Human Relations
MidAmerica Nazarene University (MBA) Masters Business Administration
MidAmerica Nazarene University (MET)
Masters Educational Technology
Current Doctoral Student at Grand Canyon University, in Organizational Leadership and Organizational Development

Occupation
Clergy, Prophet, Activist, Author and Business Consultant
Religion
Pentecostal
Parent(s)
Ernest Eugene Hill and Mary Madeline Johnson

Table of Contents to his Biographical Stretch 
1 Early Life

1.1 Earlier Years
1.2 His Mother’s Influence on His Life
1.3 Child Prodigy
1.4 Education
1.5 Military
1.6 Minister
1.7 Omaha Community Public Figure/Civic Achievements

2 Broadcaster& Television Producer
3 Social & Political Activist
4 Historian & Archivist
5 His Contribution as a Historical Preservationist and Historian
5.1 The Renaissance of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s History
5.2 The Renaissance Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s the Pre-Civil Rights History
5.3 Author of Books and Historical Video Documentaries
5.4 Books Reviewed
5.5 Historical Video Documentaries
5.6 Awards & Acknowledgements
5.7 Educational Technology Consultant
5.8 Seminar Speaker

5.9 National Prophetic Voice
6. References

7. Endnotes 
8. External  Websites


1. Early Life

1.1 Earlier Years

Rev. Elijah Leonard Hill was born in Douglas County Omaha, Nebraska on August 16, 1960, and his mother’s name was Mary Magdalene White born in Kenansville, North Carolina and his father’s name was Earnest Eugene Hill born in Little Rock, Arkansas.
[1]  He lived in the North Omaha African American community attended Long School, Franklin, [2]
 and Saratoga grade schools, Horace Mann Junior High, and attended North High for three years then graduated from William Jennings Bryant Senior High School South Omaha. [3]

Amazon Books, The Triumph of The Black Church

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1968, at Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., funeral Coretta Scott King at Ebenezer Baptist Church my mother came to Atlanta, GA just a few months after King's death.


She really did not know how she was going to meet Coretta she just trusted God and believed that God was sending her there for this purpose. She ended up getting things establish through a friend of hers she know lived there, and she finally no more than a few weeks
met with Coretta Scott King. She shared with her the reason she had come to Atlanta.
[10]

Coretta Scott King was touched by my mother’s courage to go by the leading of God with all of her small six children as a single parent. I remember going to Ebenezer Baptist Church where Dr. Marin Luther Kings’ father was the pastor, Coretta assisted my mother in us getting a place to stay, and she provided groceries for us for several months. The Ebenezer Baptist Church Coretta had her church family to adopt our family for the Christmas in 1968, and I remember all the toys they brought over to our new apartment in Atlanta, Georgia.
[11]

I remembered the reviewing of the body of Dr. Martin Luther King as a boy at eight years old they had his body in a white coffin outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church, and I remember the lines of thousands of people lining up just to pass by his coffin to pay their respects to him. My mother met Coretta on several occasions one time I remember Coretta and my mother standing and talking together at Ebenezer Baptist Church in the Basement when my mother was picking up a box of food.
[12]  My mother had many prophecies about me her son being a proper child all throughout my childhood, and she shared this with Coretta that day at the church. She asked her while we stood there, “Coretta my son has always received these prophecies about him being a proper child and a prophet do you see that, and Coretta told her yes I can see it on him that he is one of our chosen ones. [13

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

On December 1986 in the Omaha City Council Legislative Chambers the first African American City Councilman Fred Conley and Rev. Elijah Hill at 26 years old his church was responsible for the success of the first Grand Jury hearing being called in Omaha, Nebraska when African American was killed in police custody.


The Urban League of North Omaha had a feeding program that Rev. Elijah Hill worked withKearney Roundtreewith community outreach, and developed “The Operation Soul Food,”[54] summer gardening project and food give-a-way for those who were in need. Rev. Hill’s went to city of Omaha official about utilizing vacant lots in Omaha area to plough and plant vegetables in the summer, and then give away the food like; cabbage, collard greens, mustard greens, Swiss chard, tomatoes, beans, watermelon, and lettuce. The Omaha Star Newspaper wrote an article about the summer planting partnershipwith Rev. Hill’s church and the Urban League of Nebraska.  [55]
The Cox Cable Omaha Company held dialogues in 1987 with the African American community about them having access to their own channel in the Omaha, Nebraska area, and Rev. Hill was a part of those conversations because of his long time program on Cox Cable Access the partnership was published in the Omaha Star Newspaper in 1989, that the North Omaha African American community 
[56]
 had its own television channel to be aired on Cox Cable Omaha’s cable network, and on July 1990 the Metro Star Times Newspaper published an article about Rev. Hill’s Gospel Television Programming growing in Omaha, which had launched on July 3, 1989.  [57]

Chism (2013) stated, “Although black Pentecostal leaders are known for their emphasis on holiness and spiritual empowerment, they are not renowned for having led and spearheaded political protest struggles during the Civil Rights movement” ( p. 424). In 1896 the Plessy vs. Ferguson law instituted segregation in America, and it was a direct violation of the First Amendment freedom of religion and the freedom of assembly. Mason’s disagreed with this federal law upholding segregation in America. [144]  He believed that this law was a direct contradiction to his First Amendment rights surrounding freedom of religion within the Constitution of the United States and his philosophy on integration of white and black worshipping together within his African American denomination, which the constitution upheld his rights to the freedom of assemble. [145]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1970 on 25th  and Manderson St. Omaha, Nebraska, my Mother had her mission feeding the poor taking in the homeless, and having study session for children in the neighborhood.


The Omaha, Nebraska Billionaire Warren Buffet impressed with the success, business savvy and honest dealings of the Blumkins, investor Warren Buffett and Mrs. B used a simple handshake to seal the purchase of 90% of the business for Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway portfolio in 1983. The ‘Historic Omaha Handshake’ plus a simple two-page written agreement were all that were required - no audit of the store’s books, no inventory of its merchandise. [7]

Mrs. B, the Omaha community called her admired my mother’s vision to help others when she had her six small children to raise as a single parent. She helped to connect my mother with other prominent individuals within the Omaha Jewish community to help my mother to access many properties along 24th and Lake Streets to house three different storehouses of food and cloths.
[8]One significance of Omaha, Nebraskawas Omaha was the birth place of Malcom X, who came to national attention during the back drop of the Civil Rights Movement in America as a Nation of Islam leader in the early 1960s.
Mom ended up after Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968-she felt that God wanted her to go up to Atlanta to be an encouragement to Coretta Scott King.  Her heart when out to her having become single parent with her small children she could relate to her plight. At the leading of the Lord my mother took all six of her children she sold all her properties, and we moved up to Atlanta, Georgia she felt she was on a mission to be an encouragement to Coretta Scott King during this difficult time in her life. 
[9​


The Hill Family photo 1966 in Omaha, Nebraska, L-R, Anita Hill, Trina Hill, Earnest Hill, Jr., Elijah Hill, Denise Hill, Renee Hill, and Mary Hill my mother.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​

At Holy Ghost Temple Church of God in Christ located on 24th Evans, Elder Elijah Hill having alter prayer after preaching the sermon at 18 years old Omaha, NE​


On July 1978, Hill photo of him doing laboratory experiments and news article written up and acknowledge by the Dispatch Magazine of the University of Nebraska Medical Center.  [174]
On August 4, 1978, Elijah L. Hill was certificate award for eighteen-year-old learning laboratory procedures (Staining Brain Tissue and making Liquid Chromatography plates).  [175]
In October 3, 1982, in the United States Marine Corps Reserves received one of the highest awards in non-active duty service The Meritorious Mast Award on October 3, 1982.  [176]
In January 26, 1988, Honored by Mayor Bernie Simm of Omaha as being an effective commissioner no the Mayors Dr. Martin Luther King Holiday Planning Commission. [177]
Acknowledged by former Mayor P. J. Morgan by proclamation as a historian in the Omaha community proclaiming July 8, 1992 as Mother Robinson Memorial Day.  [178]
Former City Councilman Fred Conley acknowledge Rev. Elijah L. Hill for having the city to designate the second week of July as Gospel Music Festival Week in Omaha city to designate the second week of July as Gospel Music Festival Week in Omaha.  [179]
In November 1992 appointed the youngest African American by the Mayor in Omaha, Nebraska on the Landmark Heritage Preservation Commission.  [180]
Honored in 1992 by the late Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford of the Church of God in Christ the Chicagoan via proclamation as important historian for Church.  [181]
Honored in 1993 by the Governor of Nebraska for the renaissance and preservation of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s history in the State of Nebraska  [182]
Honored 1994 by the National Trust for Historic Preservation he had an impact on the Omaha community as an exemplary preservation in America.  [183]

 

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


In 1984, Rev. Elijah Hill host his newly for public access longest running religious program at that time in Omaha, Nebraska.


In 1985, Richard Kellin died in police custody after an altercation with several police Omaha police officers. City Councilman Fred Conley and Rev. Elijah Hill pushed for
a citywide petition drive to force a grand jury hearing of Kellin’s case in his wrongful death. The petition drive on December 12, 1986, the Omaha World Herald called it “One for the history books”,
[51]  because this was the first time in Omaha’s history that the citizen had signed 13, 299 valid voter registration signatures to call a grand jury hearing against the Omaha Police Department.  When City Councilman Fred Conley held a press conference presenting the petition to the City of Omaha he had Rev. Hill at the press conference table, [52]and stated Hill‘s church membership was an important factor in the success of the petitions going beyond the black community to the greater Omaha community. [53]

Elijah L. Hill Utube

CLICK ON THIS PICTURE TO VIEW ALL VIDEOS ON UTUBE

T

Elijah L. Hill Utube

His Contribution as a Historical Preservationist and Historian

The Renaissances of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s History


Rev. Elijah L. Hill did the research surrounding the Federal Registry of Historic Places Nomination to demonstrate Mother Lizzie Robinson’s history was significance in America’s history under the status of women and religion.  The nomination was passed by the Federal government in 1993, [115]  as well as Rev. Hill wrote the first and only biography on Mother Lizzie Robinson’s life in 2005 called, “Women Come Alive.”This was some of the information uncovered by Rev. Elijah Hill’s research: [116]

Books Reviewed

The purpose of this historical narrative is to describe how during the Jim Crow system in America, this small newly-formulated African American denomination and their national leader Bishop Charles Harrison Mason, faced seemingly insurmountable governmental harassment, persecution, and criminal prosecution from 1917-1920 for requesting religious liberties exemption and succeeded in court during World War I’s Selective Service military draft laws. [142]
Bishop Charles Harrison Mason, in 1895, co-founded the Church of God in Christ organization. Mason utilized a socially transformational leadership style by ordaining whites and blacks from 1917-1940 during this Pre-Civil Rights period in America, 40 years before the modern Civil Rights Movement. Mason had essentially accomplished in America what Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi had done in India, by developing a non-violent and pacifistic philosophy.  [143]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​In Omaha, Nebraska 1967, Rev. Elijah Hill pictured with his father and cibilings at a Christmas ​​


1.2 His Mother’s Influence on His Life
My mother Mary Hill came to prominence as a social advocate and humanitarian within the Omaha community as a missionary to the local African American community. She was a great humanitarian in the city of Omaha in the late 1960’s during the era of the race riots from 1964-1968
[4] She had a mission within the African American community in the city of Omaha, Nebraska called Moses and the Ten Commandments Fellowship Mission that she had started around 1964. One of the things that she provided for the community was she acquired food to feed the hungry and she developed a relationship with the Jewish community who gave her many cloths to give away to those in our community that needed it. [5]  My mother had a great relationship with Mrs. Blufkins who was a multimillionaire that founded the national furniture chain the Nebraska Furniture Mart in the late 1960s and throughout the early 1980s. [6]

Elder Hill is the current president of the two On-line museums The National Museum of African American History.  The COGICMuseum.org the first electronic museum introduced to the Church of God in Christ in 2007, which documented and electronically chronicled as a cultural anthropologist the history of the church of God in Christ On-Line.[109]  He implemented a digital record keeping system of management of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s collection archiving her collection of 70 books and 700 photos, and placed them On-Line.  [110]  Rev. Elijah L. Hill, a COGIC minister, author, historian, and cultural anthropologist, deposited his collection of COGIC historical materials at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center on March 6, 2013.[111]  The collection includes the papers of COGIC Women’s Department founder Mother Lizzie Robinson and her daughter Ida F. Baker, as well as other publications collected by Hill.  The Mother Lizzie Robinson / Rev. Elijah L. Hill Collection includes 478 original photographs (circa 1899-1960s), approximately 100 publications, and Hill’s research files on Robinson.

As a result of Rev. Elijah Hill’s research and studies surrounding the missing Pre-Civil Rights in America, there are several things exposed to our history. These publications Rev. Hill produced on Bishop Charles Harrison Mason highlight his Pre-Civil Rights history as missing history in America.  [148]  To highlight the missing era of African American Pre-Civil Rights in America’s history Rev. Elijah L. Hill published a biography on Bishop Charles Harrison Mason called, “The Triumph of The Black Church,” in May 2013.  [149]  He is started working on his doctoral dissertation in December 2011 focusing around this topic called, “A Historical Case Study on the Pre-Civil Rights Themes in the Church of God in Christ Organization is Similar to Themes in the American Civil Rights Movement.” These are the key historical points highlighted as important missing history in America’s Pre-Civil Rights history.  [150]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​


 [62] There was a serious of events during this festival for the entire Omaha community, like, Peony Park donated free rides for youth participating in the drug awareness seminars, a Parade, banquet giving awards for youth for youth achievement, youth seminars, and open door concert at the Gene Leahy Mallin downtown Omaha. [63]
Rev. Elijah L. Hill, (January 27, 1992), submits two applications to Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission for Landmark Designation of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s daughter’s Home, address 2864 Corby St, and for Robinson Memorial Church of God in Christ, address 2318 N. 26th St,”.  
[64]    [65]  Hill also submitted for the National Register of Historic Places Nomination of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s last home as Significant to America’s history,” Property approved by United States Department of the Interior National Park Service on February 25, 1993.  [68]

Joseph Friend, President of City Council Omaha, Nebraska, (November 10, 1992), City Council Resolution Legislative Chamber, “Mayor of Omaha appointing Rev. Elijah L. Hill as serving on the Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to serve for three year term.

The Book “Women Come Alive”, reviewed Dr. Deborah Gill, Assemblies of God Professor of History James H. Railey, Jr., D.Th., professor of Theology, Assemblies of God Theological Seminary in 2006 in the Enrichment Magazine during the 100th Celebration of Pentecostalism in America. [160]
In 2006, this above-mentioned book was reviewed in The Whole Truth Magazine the National Magazine for the Church of God in Christ Worldwide by Dr. Adrienne M. Israel professor of History and intercultural studies at Guilford College.  [161]
The book “The Unsealing of the Last Things”, on Biblical Prophecy it was reviewed by Dr. David A. Hall, Sr. CEO, Church of God in Christ Publishing House, Memphis, Tennessee in 1998.  [162]
The Book “Azusa Street Revival Wrapped in Swaddling Clothes, Lying in a Manger”, the biography of Bishop William J. Seymour founder of the globalization of Pentecostalism, and the review was conducted by The Christian Service Network in 2007.  [163]

 

[112]  Elijah Hill, the COGIC minister and historian who deposited Robinson's personal papers at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center in Springfield, Missouri, delivered the keynote address. He noted that Robinson lost her position as matron of Arkansas Baptist College after she was baptized in the Holy Spirit at age 46. COGIC founder Charles H. Mason then asked her to organize women in the COGIC. Hill explained how Robinson encouraged COGIC women to become self-determining, before the broader society recognized women's suffrage and civil rights for African-Americans.  [113]  Hill noted that the original Pentecostal vision, which "transcended racism and sexism”, made it possible for Robinson to emerge as a leader. Importantly, Robinson provided the initial vision for COGIC world missions and the Women's Department funded COGIC missionaries. Hill noted, "The globalization of COGIC came from Lizzie Robinson.  [114]

Newest Book Release of Rev. Elijah Hill is, "The Missing Link of The American Civil Rights Movement CLICK THIS TO PURCHASE!

In the past others within the organization would personally research the organization's history, and wrote entire biographies; for example: Professor James Courts 1907-1920, book written [Bishop Charles Harrison Mason's and his Co-laborers], Bishop Charles Pleas 1907-1955, Book written [Fifty Years of Achievement From 1906-1956], Bishop Ithiel Clemmons 1940-1996 book written [Bishop C.H. Mason and the Roots of the Church of God in Christ] [98], Elder Elijah L. Hill 1990-Present, Four books written [Women Come Alive, biography of Mother Lizzie Robinson, The Azusa Street Revival, Wrapped in Swaddling Cloths Lying in a Manger, Biography of William J. Seymour, The Triumph of The Black Church, biography of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason, The 1917 FBI files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason.  [99]

Identified and researched her properties that were significant to her history in the Omaha surrounding area. He implemented and conducted research in order to negotiate with the City’s Land Marks Heritage Preservation Commission to historically landmark her life story as significant to Nebraska’s State History.[100]  He participated in public hearings and meetings to support the first Church of God in Christ to be historically landmark, and he wrote the nomination for the Federal Registry of historic places to accept Mother Lizzie Robinson’s local property and history to be identified as significant to America’s history.[101]   He also implemented the negotiations with city officials to have the first street named after a woman in the state of Nebraska in his city, and Elder Hill is one of two personalities to get a street named after a founding personality the other was the former Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford for Bishop Charles Harrison Mason in 1958.[102]   Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford gave Elder Hill a proclamation from the Presiding Bishop Office in Memphis, TN, for preserving the heritage of the Church of God in Christ of one of our founding personalities in their church history in 1992.  [103]

Rev. Elijah l. Hill invited to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 's celebration of his assassination at Loraine Hotel, Memphis, TN, April 4, 2014,  Rev. Hill places a rare photo of Mother Lizzie Robinson during Church history section on activism and interracialism in America.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


In 1994, Rev. Elijah Hill gets the first Street naming for an African American woman in the State of Nebraska


The Church of God in Christ is the largest African American Pentecostal religious organization in the world. Mother Lizzie Robinson lived in Omaha, Nebraska for thirty-six years before her death in 1945.  [71]
The Omaha Star Newspaper Weekly, (November 1993), wrote an article “Rev. Hill Appointed to Landmarks Commission,” Omaha, Nebraska. 
[72] At the Omaha World Herald the editor Jannet Walsh on August 5, 1992, wrote this article on Rev. Hill street name change for Mother Lizzie Robinson for the Omaha, Nebraska community, called “Stretch of Erskine Now Lizzie Robinson Avenue,” Omaha World Herald Newspaper, Omaha, Nebraska. [73]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1994, Governor E. Benjamin Nelson invites Rev. Elijah L. Hill to the State Capitol of Nebraska to give him the Governor's Recognition Award.


 Dr. David Hall editor of the Whole Truth Newspaper in Memphis, TN, wrote on April 1993, this article, called “State of Nebraska’s Governor’s Recognition Award,” The Whole Truth Newspaper, Memphis, TN.   [74] The editor of the Tri-State Defender Newspaper in headquartered in Memphis, TN wrote on October 7, 1992, called, “Sign of the Times: Street Honors L. Robinson,” Memphis, TN.  [75]
On February 20, 1993, E. Benjamin Nelson, Governor of State of Nebraska, Issuance the Governor’s Recognition Award to Rev. Elijah L. Hill, for his Civic achievement towards the Renaissance and Preservation of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s history in the state of Nebraska, held at the State Capitol in Lincoln, Nebraska
[76]

Broadcaster& Television Producer
Hill became one of the early broadcasters with the Public Access channel on Cox Cable Omaha in early 1984, having a personal ministry television program from over twelve years in the Omaha community. He aired the A Way Out Of No Way Ministry Television program in the Omaha community until he created a business partnership with the North Omaha Cable Association Consortium (NOCAC),   
[77] where he was over the African American Religious channel on Sundays airing 11 hours of television programming. Hill and his staff and studio produced local churches services ecumenically, and aired gospel videos, children’s programs, local concerts.  [78]
He started the Gospel Television Broadcasting in the Omaha area, and was recognized for hosting the Gospel Over Drugs Festival in collaboration with Omaha Mayor’s Office P.J. Morgan. 
[79] The event was to increase awareness of youth African American youth in the North Omaha community to look at other alternatives to selling drugs. The event involved an awards banquet for youth, a parade, a downtown Omaha outdoor concert, and training and role-playing with various youth from the North Omaha community. The Governor and Mayor of Omaha acknowledge Rev. Hill and his organization by proclamation that Omaha was now the Gospel Capitol of the State of Nebraska. [80]
In 1989, Hill attended and joined the National Religious Broadcasters Associations where he meet a Christian group that assisted him in applying for a Low Power Television Station License for the Omaha, Nebraska community TV-34. The Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) wanted to purchase the license because it covered two of the major cities in Nebraska, Omaha, and Lincoln. He held this license for 10 years under his wife’s name Catherine Hill, but was not able to capitalize the construction of the proposed television station where he turned the frequency back over to the Federal Communication Commission. 
[81]
In 1989, Hill attended the Black Newspaper Publishers Convention in Chicago, Illinois it was there he met the Late Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford of the Church of God in Christ worldwide. Bishop Ford invited Hill to come and speak at his church as a media representative in the Omaha area to speak before his graduates to encourage them, Ford had Hill picked up by his personal limousine, and brought to his Chicago church called St. Paul Church of God in Christ. Presiding Bishop Ford told him he admired his talent that the Church of God in Christ needed young men like him, and that he would call on him to assist him with something in the national church. Hill talked with Presiding Bishop Ford on the importance of Gospel Television growing to impact youth with his creative types of television programs. 
[82
]
 

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

​​In 1984, the Omaha Star Newspaper mentions Rev. Hill at 23 years old preforms Invocation for 20,000 attendees in Omaha, NE.

Cunningham had Hill picked up in a limousine from his home to bring him to the event, and while the security brought him to Cunningham he asked Rev. Hill, “Do you think you can do it, and Rev. Hill spoke confidently and told him,” I’m ready just get me over to the microphone.” In 1984 in July the Omaha Star Newspaper wrote an article on Rev. Hill being at Rosenblatt Stadium as the minister conducting the vocational prayer for this celebration before 20,000 attendees at the age of twenty four years old. 
[47] Richard Felman a prominent attorney amazed by Hill’s speaking called Omaha’s largest newspaper the Omaha World Herald two weeks later on July 14, 1984, and they did a full-page newspaper article in the religious section written by Lynn Zerschling, called, “Energetic Pastor “Pulls Them off the Street”. The Omaha Newspaper highlighted Hill as a child prodigy at his early age for writing, charismatic speaking ability, and shared his story of how he was starting a new church in North Omaha.  [48]

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Education and Professional Life

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1993, Omaha, Nebraska City Council Legislative Chambers Rev. Elijah Hill is sworn in by Mayor P.J. Morgan to be appointed on the Landmark Heritage Preservation Commission.


[69] The Omaha World Herald Newspaper wrote an article editor Joe Brennan, (August 5, 1992), “Council Says: Here‘s to You Mrs. Robinson,” Omaha World Herald Newspaper. Omaha, Nebraska, Page 15. [70]

Rev. Elijah Hill had achieve getting the first street naming for a female in the state of Nebraska in the history of the state called, “Lizzie Robinson Avenue,” she was the first General Mother for the Church of God in Christ, Inc., appointed by Bishop Charles Harrison Mason in 1911

 

​​​​​​​​​

The saving of Peony Park became big news in the Omaha community, but on April 12, 1994 after 3 ½ hours of testimony, Peony Park failed to get Landmark status. For the first time in Omaha’s history, the Landmark Heritage Preservation Commission had to hold this hearing in the City Council Legislative Chambers because of the media and all that attended the meeting with Rev. Hill chairing the meeting that day.  [92]
Hill ran for the national trustee board of the Churches of God in Christ organization in November of 2008 as national trustee and received 705 votes he needed 1500 to win. This was the first time that he had run for any political office with the Church of God in Christ organization his political campaign was called, “Look to the Hill”.  [93]  Recently during this nation’s shutdown, Rev. Hill felt that many people were being hurt behind the politics of this nation, and he wrote a letter surrounding the congressional representatives that were facilitating the shutdown were violating their oath of office based upon the congressional records focusing around impeachment. On October 14, 2013, he leased a press release on Facebook and Twitter called, “Impeachment of recall Current Congressional Representatives Facilitating Shutdown.  [94]

It was sent out to hundreds of national media outlets, and 48 hours later, the President of the United States Barack Obama announced the Congressional Representatives have an agreement to discontinue the government shutdown. Rev. Hill believes in Reinhold Niebuhr’s philosophy “The prophetic Tradition”, which means, “the idea of nonviolent coercion, which involves s religious leader transcending his religious faith and begins to speak to social and political systems for the greater good of the public.  [95]

In 1917 the United States government instituted the first draft law surrounding joining the military to fight in World War I. Mason defended his freedom of religion by arguing before the President of the United States and the War Department, while visiting in Washington, D.C that the Constitution of the United States affirmed under freedom of religion his Church of God in Christ member’s rights to obey their biblical faith in not taking of human life. [146]  The scholar Schlabach confirms this in his study stating, “…the Church of God in Christ believed that the Bible prohibited combat warfare. Subsequently, the Bureau of Investigations (BOI) investigated Mason and other COGIC members in Memphis and accused them of conspiring to commit crimes against the United States”.  [147].

In 1906, Bishop William J. Seymour host a Revival at the Azusa Street Mission interracially mixed. Seymour theme “Whosoever will let him come let brotherly Love Prevail,” washed away by the power of God and by the blood of the lamb. Mason also sees a confirmation of God working interracially with Seymour’s ministry this confirms his vision to gather my people together white and black starting one of the first interracial movements in the Deep South during Jim Crow.  [153]
In 1917, FBI files on Bishop Charles Harrison Mason where he becomes the first African American denominational leader to be investigated by the FBI. Mason adopts a multicultural creed in worship within the Church of God in Christ denomination contradicting America’s jurisprudence Plessy vs. Ferguson, the separation of white and black as a race in America. The adopted creed discovered in the FBI file on Mason, “The Church of God in Christ recognizes the fact that all believers are in Christ recognizes the fact that all believers are one in Christ Jesus and all its members have equal rights. It's Overseers, both colored and white, have equal POWER AND AUTHORITY IN CHURCH.  [154]

​​​​​​​​

In Tallahassee, Florida, on the Preach The Word Network September 26, 2014, Prophet Elijah L. Hill is interviewed on what he remembers at 8 years old of his mother moving to Atlanta to meet Coretta Scott King after King's death.


During that year and a half that we lived there in Atlanta, Georgia was when my mother wrote her first booklet called, “Sell what you have and give to the Poor.” I remember when my mother got the pages and all of her kids was lined up in her apartment we helped put the pages together after she got the copies from a printer.
[14]  My mother told me later that she had shared her book project with Coretta, and she had Dr. Martin Luther Kings’ secretary who at that time was a white individual to help type up some of the pages to this booklet. The other half of the book Coretta’s secretary finished it for her before she took it to the printer in Atlanta.  
[15]  This was the first time I had seen an African American write and produce their own publication, and this is what encouraged and inspired me to write at such an early age having written four books at the age of seventeen years old while I was still in High School.  [16]

1.3 Child Prodigy
Rev. Hill always loved going to school he enjoyed academic achievement always graduating at the top of his class in the North Omaha area schools in that he attended. He always excelled in school as a child and young adult winning citizenship, honor roll, and prefect attendance throughout his school years unless his family had relocated.
[17]

He started preaching the gospel as a boy preacher at the age of 16 years old, and by the age of seventeen years old had
authored three books on the topics of Angels, Who Was Christ before He Came to Earth, and who was Satan in Heaven and his Earthly Works. By the age of eighteen, he had written a book on the topic of Eschatology on Biblical Prophecy covering the books of Daniel and Revelations, called “The Unsealing of The Last Things, and all three books were copy written by him in Washington, D.C., in the early “80’s”. 
[18]

At the age of sixteen he attended the Comprehensive Employment and Training Agency the (CETA) summer youth program working for the University of Nebraska Medical Center the summers of 1976 and 1978 working as a laboratory technician. During these two years, he learned different laboratory procedures that doctorial level students and medical professions had to do in the laboratory. The University of Nebraska Medical Center staff recognized him with awards these two years for learning laboratory procedures (Staining Brain Tissue and making Liquid Chromatography plates) before having taken chemistry and biology in High school.
 [19]
In 1978, The University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Dispatch Magazine had written on his amazing work at seventeen years old at the College of Pharmacy’s Biomedicine Chemistry Laboratory. He learned a doctoral a doctorial medical student’s eight-step theoretical laboratory procedure for detecting cancer in animals, while he know for making the best liquid chromatography plates many professors in the College of Pharmacy sought him out to request the use of his plates within their experiments. The medical staff at the University of Nebraska Medical Center led by Dr. John H. Copenhaver wrote a recommendation July 1978 that Elijah be given the opportunity to take classes with graduating medical students since his aptitude and learning ability was usual for a youth his age. [20]

​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1983, Corporal Elijah L. Hill at 23 years old in the United States Marine Corps Reserves in Camp LeJunes, N.C. on active duty for the summer for 8 weeks. 


Hill during his tenure in the United States Marine Corps Reserves received one of the highest awards in non-active duty service The
Meritorious Mast Awardon October 3, 1982 for assisting thousands of active duty marines during a heat wave by repairing nine large refrigeration units to keep their barracks cool during extreme heat conditions. 
[34]
Captain Richard B. Maher, who was over the Omaha, Nebraska division of the United States Marine Corps Reserves Engineer Equipment Maintenance Repair Unit., promoted Hill in the ranks all the way to corporal on August 1, 1981; he was a corporal at the time of his honorable discharged from the United States Marine Corps Reserves on November 7, 1984. 
[35]

1. 6 Minister
He started preaching at the early age of sixteen years old at his grandfather’s church in Omaha, Nebraska called Holy Ghost Revival Fellowship Church, and his mother attended Holy Ghost Temple Church of God in Christ in Omaha Pastor Mack Reed was the pastor. Pastor Mack Reed became his spiritual father in the gospel who mentored him as a boy preacher, and ordained him in the North Omaha community from the age of nineteen years old in the Church of God in Christ. 
[36]

Pastor Mack Reed tutored Hill in the things the adult minister should know in ministry to the point he became a speaker a well-known speaker in many area Omaha churches before he graduated from High School. Pastor Mack Reed of Holy Ghost Temple Church of God in Christ, in Omaha, Nebraska,
[37] encouraged Hill to study other intellectual and knowledgeable sources as well as the Bible. Pastor Reed was an avid self-taught reader and encouraged me to read theology books of all kinds when I was still in high school. Pastor Mack Reed only had a third-grade education, and he inspired Hill to seek knowledge and take advantage of my education so I could be an effective and knowledgeable speaker as a man of God. [38]

The Renaissances Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s the Pre-Civil Rights History

One of the more important legal issues that legal scholars continue to dispute over is the First Congress’s original meaning of the First Amendment Free Exercise Clause. It is important to note that historically America has had great challenges during wartime relating to the rule of constitutional law surrounding the violation of First Amendment rights of its citizens. The most repressive of these times was during World War I in 1918 when Congress created the Sedition Act of 1918.[137]
To highlight the missing era of African American Pre-Civil Rights in America’s history Rev. Elijah L. Hill published a biography on Bishop Charles Harrison Mason called, “The Triumph of The Black Church,”  [138]The Renaissances Bishop Charles Harrison Mason’s the Pre-Civil Rights History

Mother Lizzie Robinson Dedication Rev. Elijah L. Hill dedication speaker October 4, 2013, Assembly of God World Headquarters.


In Fort Dodge, Iowa 1993, Pastor Mack Reed running a revival with Elder Elijah Hill Pastor Mack Reed was Elder Elijah Hill father in the Gospel he trained him from the age of 16 in ministry Pastor Mack Reed was the Pastor of Holy Ghost Temple Church of God in Christ in Omaha, NE.


Hill traveled the United States as an evangelist in the Church of God in Christ in 1982 to 1983 preaching in Church of God in Christ Churches throughout the country. It was in 1984, that he returned to Omaha and started his first church A Way Out Of No Way Church of God in Christ on 24th Lake St. Hill pastored in Omaha for 11 years [39] until he reappointed someone under his ministry to continue the church when he and his family relocated to Kansas City, Missouri in 1995 to attend school at MidAmerica Nazarene University.  [40] When he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, he attended Barker Temple Church of God in Christ when the late Bishop E. Harris Moore was pastor, [41] and he became an associate minister at the church until he completed his education in 2001, then moved to Arlington, Te


Mother Lizzie Robinson, Rev. Elijah Hill, Church of God in Christ,

Historical Video Documentaries

  1. Women Come Alive Video, the documentary of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s life produced in 2006 was a 30 minutes production.  [164]
  2. Bishop William J. Seymour and Bishop Charles Harrison Mason creating interracial worship in America through the Pentecostal faith it was produced in 2007.  [165]
  3. Fall Peace With All men Holiness Without No Man Shall See the Lord,” it was 1 hour and 20minutes in length produced on January 2013.  [166]
  4. Women Come Alive Photo Album video where Elder Hill, listed and named over 100 old pioneers by name in the video produced in 2007.  [167]
  5. October 4, 2013, Mother Lizzie Robinson/Rev. Elijah L. Hill Collection dedication at the Assemblies of God Seminary.  [168]
  6. October 4, 2013, Interview surrounding Women’s Ministry in the Church of God in Christ as compared to the Assemblies of God.  [169]
  7. On March 2013, Rev. Hill, spoke at the Assemblies of God Seminary surrounding his new book coming out called the “Triumph of The Black Church.  Hill pointed out how Bishop Charles Harrison Mason was investigated by the FBI in 1918 to 1920.  [170] He pointed out how Mason institutionalized interracial worship within his African American organization, and how he wrote a law against Plessy vs. Ferguson of 1896 called “The Equal Right of Authority that white and black within the Church of God in Christ organization could worship together and have equal authority over black as well as white members.  [171]


In this year May 2013, he has just completed an extensive work called, “The Triumph of The Black Church, “on the life of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason. [172]  Elder Hill has been a contributory writer for the Whole Truth on several occasions for Dr. David Hall, Sr.   He has written for the Church of God in Christ Publishing House for the Young People Willing Workers writing and develop curriculum for Bishop Whitehead and their national publication for national print. [173]

​​​​​​​​​

In  1990, in Chicago, Illinois, Pastor Elijah Hill was invited to the Presiding Bishop's Louis Henry Ford Church to speak picked up in his limousine.

Social & Political Activist
Hill in 1983, developed a program in the North Omaha community with his church membership called Operation Soul Food where they partnered with the Urban League of Nebraska called the “Multiplication of Loaves Project, “ where they planted gardens in vacant city lots to harvest food planted by volunteers from Hill’s church to feed the hungry in the North Omaha community.
[83]

​​​​​​


On March 28, 1994, Omaha City then Councilman Frank Christensen held a press conference in the Omaha Douglas County Civic Center surrounding Rev. Elijah L. Hill, calling for a special meeting.  
[90]  The meeting was for the Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to review the possibility of Peony Park a 75-year-old amusement park to be designated as a landmark so that developers would not be able to auction off the property.  [91]

​​​​​​​​​


He became chairperson a few months later then his duties were to oversee public forums and his committee to review and maintain historic properties as a source of the city’s civic and cultural pride for future generations. His committees’ duties were to designate, preserve, protect, and enhance the perpetuation of the city’s historical structures to maintain their heritage[87]
Rev. Hill, because of his work in propelling the church of God in Christ to Civic visibility in the Omaha secular community was appointed the first and youngest African American to be appointed to the City’s Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission.
 [88]  He historically implemented the institution Roberts Rules of Orders for the Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission holding public meetings in the City of Omaha, Nebraska.  [89]


Many of the denomination's early pioneers stayed at the Corby Street when they visited Omaha. Criterion Consideration "A" is applicable and is met through the property deriving significance for its association with a person important in religious history. [119]
The Church further developed when Mason organized the Women's Department, the Sunday school and the Young Peoples Willing Workers (YPWW) between 1910 and 1916. These departments needed people to run them, and Lizzie Robinson was recommended to Charles Mason as qualified to supervise the Women's Department. Lizzie Robinson was the first National Supervisor of Women's Departments of the Church of God in Christ, serving from 1911 through 1945. [120]   She was born a slave on April 5, 1860, in Phillips County, Arkansas. Her mother, a widow with five children, could not read but did send her children to school. Lizzie Robinson read the Bible to her mother's friends from the ages of eight to fifteen years, when her mother died.  [121]

Educational Technology Consultant

In Kansas City, Missouri on March 8, 2002 Hill, was hired by Marian Brown principle of Benjamin Banneker Charter Academy  [184] to upgrade their educational technology and be an instructor in their technology computer lab. When he had established the internet connectivity with Time Warner Cable the children were able to have internet access, since before they only had computer terminals not computer internet access.  [185]  He converted the computer lab into a multimedia lab by ordering new digitized system that allowed the computer screen to be projected on a 4 X 6 white board. The Lab became a live theater to allow children to experience how technology enhances and stimulated a student’s ability to learn. [186]
In June of 2002, Hill became a technology consultant with Missions Control of Houston, Texas, and he collaborate a partnership with a charter school Urban Community Leadership Academy, upgrading their technology with the Federal Governments Libraries receiving a grant for technology upgrade valued at $500,000. [187]
In May of 2014, Rev. Hill moved to Atlanta, Georgia to organize the National Entertainment Technology Academy he wrote the Governor of Georgia Nathan Deal a letter on January 28, 2015, Rev. Elijah Hill wrote a letter to the Governor of Georgia Nathan Deal about his Entertainment Technology Academy concept, stating that, the state of Georgia is leading our nation in being No.1 in two categories; a good place to do business and relocating of businesses in America.  [188]  Georgia ranked fifth in the world in movie film production, and sixth in the world job creation unmasking $216 Million dollars in job creation for the film industry. This Entertainment Technology Center concept will address several areas it will prepare Georgians who have dropped out of High School and help with recidivism with juveniles and prison inmates to develop a trade to close the revolving door on Georgia's prison population.  [189]

Hill shared with the Governor a concept for Georgia for an Entertainment Technology Center concept, its end purpose will be to allow children and adults to build games, producing their own movies, television shows, graphics for Hollywood, and music for the music industry. The goal will be train them, then foster collaborative partnerships with Fortune 500 companies in the entertainment industry to develop a future Georgian workforce adding to job creation to serve the unemployed and underemployed in Georgia.  [190]

This Entertainment Technology Center concept will address several areas it will prepare Georgians who have dropped out of High School and help with recidivism with juveniles and prison inmates to develop a trade to close the revolving door on Georgia's prison population. Many drop-outs will without education and trades have a higher chance to increase Georgia's crime rate and recidivism rates. The incarceration of juvenile prisoners cost the state $90,000 annually not to mention adult prisoners. With the movie industry bring financial success to Georgia, by implementing this Entertainment Technology Center concept across our state, this will increase Georgia’s work force to compliment a future workforce to nurture second chance opportunities giving individuals a fair chance to become a productive asset to the state of Georgia’s society. [191]

On February 6, 2015, Governor Nathan Deal’s office encouraged Rev. Elijah Hill to reach out the Georgia Development of Economic Development’s Office Chris Carr the commissioner of this department find out more about Georgia’s new direction in workforce development in the entertainment industry. On February 12, 2015, Lee Thomas responded from the Georgia Film, Music, and Digital Entertainment office informing me that Georgia is at its beginning creation of a new “Georgia Film Academy”, and that 24 Colleges and tech schools are offering degrees or certification in the entertainment industry in Georgia, that the board of Regent is just in its infancy stage on the development of the film academy for local Universities. [192]

As the Atlanta Business Chronicle stated, September 26, 2014, that The Georgia Film Academy will unite film-related programs at the University System’s schools with those of the Technical College System of Georgia. The University System has launched a study that will assess workforce needs, the schools’ existing programs and the number of students entering the programs, Vice Chancellor for extended education at the University System of Georgia who is heading up the project. During the year ending June 2014, 158 feature films and television productions were shot in the state, according to the Georgia Department of Economic Development. According to the Motion Picture Association of America, the film industry is responsible for more than $3.8 billion in wage and 77, 900 total jobs in Georgia, which includes indirect jobs and vendors.  [193]
Rev. Hill has since have been participating as a committee member for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice to develop concepts for youth coming from reentry for vocational training and recreational development The state of Georgia has become the second in the world for producing movies within the United States. Hill developed this idea while doing this thesis in his master’s degree program in Educational Technology at MidAmerica Nazarene University in 2000. He will be developing a charter school focusing around Entertainment Technology, and consulting with other area schools that want to develop an Entertainment Technology program and curriculum within their schools. [194]

On July 8, 1992, Elder Elijah Hill conducted an official Proclamation service for Mother Lizzie Robinson held at Robinson Memorial Church of God in Christ. In 1993 recognized by the Governor of the State of Nebraska for the renaissance of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s history is a vital part of Nebraska history of personalities that had a global humanitarian contribution to the world. The National Trust for Historic Preservation recognized Elder Hill for Historic Preservation as a national preservationist in urban America nationally.  [104]  In 1993.E. Benjamin Nelson, Governor of Nebraska, (February 20, 1993), Letter to Rev. Elijah L. Hill congratulating being a recipient of the Nebraska Governor’s Recognition Award, Lincoln, NE. [105]
Rev. Elijah L. Hill, as chairperson of Omaha’s Landmark Heritage Preservation Commission on December 15, 1993, wrote a letter to the City Attorney’s office requesting research called, “Letter from Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission to City of Omaha Law Department to then City Attorney Mary Elliston to inquire about commission rules of order. [106]  Rev. Hill was the youngest African American to be appointed on the Omaha Landmark Preservation Commission and who was the first to implement formal Roberts Rules of Order for the commission.  [107]  On, March 29, 1994, the Omaha World Herald editor Joe Brennan, wrote an article about Rev. Elijah Hill trying to save the oldest theme park in the Omaha, Nebraska community called, “Saving Peony Impossible, Peschio Says: Designating It a Landmark Called Futile,” Omaha World Herald Newspaper, Omaha, Nebraska, and Page. 11. [108]

In May 2013, and also published “The 1917 FBI Files of Bishop Charles Harrison Mason,” in May 2015. [139] He is started working on his doctoral dissertation in December 2011 focusing around this topic called, “A Historical Case Study on the Pre-Civil Rights Themes in the Church of God in Christ Organization is Similar to Themes in the American Civil Rights Movement.”  [140]
Bishop Charles Harrison Mason as an African American religious organization’s change leader in the beginning 20th Century Pentecostal Movement as it relates to his First Amendment rights of the Freedom of Religion in the Constitution of the United States. He approached the United States government during World War I’s 1917 Selective Service (Draft) law to negotiate his organization’s civil liberties as Christians to uphold their religious freedom as conscientious objectors to World War I’s military draft laws. [141].

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

In 1990, Pastor Elijah Hill runs 11 hours of Gospel Television programming for the African American religious community the late Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford takes picture with Hill in Chicago support his efforts.


The company Cox Cable was willing to offer a channel access, but no one had equipment, so Rev. Hill offered to the North Omaha African American community to utilize his church’s super-VHS ,$30,000 worth of television equipment to assist the African American community produce their own independent programming. Therefore, the Cox Cable company developed a partnership with the North Omaha Cable Association Consortium (NOCAC) was developed by Elija Ali was over regular community programming 
[58]  and Rev. Elijah Hill became the producer of the African American Religious channel on Sundays airing 11 hours of television programming. Hill and his staff and studio called Gospel Television broadcasting produced local churches services ecumenically, and aired gospel videos, children’s programs, and filmed local gospel concerts. [59]  Fred Coney, Omaha City Councilman, (December 10, 1991), Submitted City Omaha City Council Resolution, “That Rev. Elijah L. Hill introduced the first Gospel Programming on Cable Television for the African American Religious community. [60]  P.J. Morgan, Mayor of the City of Omaha, Nebraska, (December 13, 1991),   [61]
  Proclamation for Pastor Elijah L. Hill acknowledging of Omaha as the Gospel Capitol of Nebraska and Rev. Hill hosting Gospel Music Festival Week on July 5, 1992. Governor E. Benjamin Nelson, (December 10, 1992), Official Proclamation to Rev. Elijah L. Hill surrounding him starting the Gospel Music Festival and declaring Omaha the capitol of Gospel Music in the state of Nebraska. Rev. Hill, called the Festival concert, The GOD concert “Gospel Over Drugs,” focusing on the theme of teaching youth to learn to not turn to drugs as a way of life be looking at other alternatives

Type your.First, Charles Harrison Mason first interracialist believed in the first Amendment to the Constitution surrounding freedom of Assembly Mason's preaching had broken the color line in the Deep South and manifested interracial worship where white as well as black to come into fellowship under the banner of Holiness, in 1883 at the first Conway, Arkansas revival.  [151]
Ten years later in Memphis, TN Mason continues in his gospel ministry with white and black followers, which was a contradiction of Plessy Vs. Ferguson utilizing segregation based upon race. He met in 1901, Memphis, Tennessee Rev. Leonard P. Adams, white attorney, pastor in Memphis area becomes a part of Mason’s fellowship of White and black churches. [152]

The text of this website  page is available for modification and reuse under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License and the GNU Free Documentation License (unversioned, with no invariant sections, front-cover texts, or back-cover texts).

The residence at 2864 Corby Street is significant under National Register Criterion B, associated with the lives of persons significant in our past, because it is the only extant building in Omaha associated with Mrs. Lizzie Robinson. Lizzie Robinson and her husband Reverend Edward D. Robinson resided at 2864 Corby Street with their daughter from 1916 to 1924. In 1916, Edward and Lizzie Robinson founded the Church of God in Christ in Omaha, the first church of that denomination in the state of Nebraska. Mrs.[117]  Lizzie Robinson is significant historically for her role as national organizer of the women's ministry for the Church of God in Christ, the largest African American Pentecostal denomination in the world. [118]

2013 Orlando, FL. National Elder's Council Speaker Elder Elijah L. Hill guest speaker for Seminar

There she became acquainted with the Church of God in Christ and with Charles Mason. Lizzie Wood then left the Baptist church and worked for the Church of God in Christ in Trenton and Jackson, Tennessee in 1911. Charles Mason appointed Lizzie Wood Supervisor of the Women's Department in Memphis, Tennessee in 1911. She formed the Prayer and Bible Band, the Sewing Circle, and the Home and Foreign Mission Board. [122]
During this time she met, and later married, Edward Robinson, a minister. Edward and Lizzie Robinson were evangelists in western United States until they settled in Omaha and founded a church there in 1916. They lived with her daughter, Ida Baker, and her husband Archie at 2864 Corby Street from 1916 until 1924, when the Robinson's purchased a house at 2723 North 28th Avenue. Ida and Archie moved to Omaha in 1912.  [123]
Lizzie Robinson is referred to with esteem and praise in several texts. Some of that commentary follows. "[O]ne of the church's pioneering ladies'....help...organize and structure the church. "[She laid] the foundation for the church's women's department...She was distinguished by her gifted teaching ministry...Lizzie Robinson's brilliance as an organizer was foundational to the work of women in the denomination and set the pace for years to come."  [124]  "No writer could do justice to her life work of this illustrious woman of God, nor of the numerous deeds of kindness done by her, nor the height of esteem in which she was held by thousands of followers.....a woman of very high standing...an outstanding record in public service...an organizer, able to inspire and direct...one of the greatest organizers among Christian women."  [125]
Rev. Elijah L. Hill wanted to bring about a rediscovery of her history as it pertained to her significance to the Omaha community and her global humanitarian impact to the Church of God in Christ as a denomination. He had to undertake the task of rebuilding her legacy before the local and the national community resulted in his appointed as a historian by the current Bishop of Nebraska in 1989 as State Historian of Nebraska. Rev. Elijah L. Hill accomplished ten key things for the Omaha, Nebraska community and nationally to revisit the renaissance of the life and legacy of Mother Lizzie Robinson:  [126]

1990 requested that the national church share a proclamation surrounding the significance of Mother Lizzie Robison to the national church’s history. [127]
1992 had the first church she and her husband founded placed on Omaha’s local landmark heritage list. [128]
1993 wrote the nomination to have Mother Lizzie Robinson only existing home placed on the Federal Registry of historic places.  [129]
1994 had a street named after her called “the Mother Lizzie Robinson Avenue” [130]
1995 uncovered all of Mother Lizzie Robinson’s Collection, which comprised of 500 photos of Church of God in Christ history globally and 100 or more books, yearbooks, pamphlets, personal documents from the family home that will be a part of this dedication today.  [131]
2005 in 15 years later complete the only full-length book on the Biography of Mother Lizzie Robinson since her death in 1945, which came 60 years after her death.  [132]
In 2006, produced a full length documentary on Mother Lizzie Robinson’s life  [133]
On October 4, 2013 a celebration for Mother Lizzie Robinson life, work, and historical collection at Assemblies of God Seminary.  [134]
On October 4, 2013, doing a television interview about Mother Lizzie Robinson and comparing the legacy and accomplishments of Assemblies of God women. [135]
On April 4-5, 2014, during the National Civil Rights Museum’s Grand Reopening Exhibit commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s 46th Anniversary Assassination in Memphis, TN, Rev. Elijah L. Hill was an invited guest because he gave a historic photo of Mother Lizzie Robinson for her accomplishment in the black church for preaching to interracial audiences during Jim Crow in America, and establishing the first bank account for the Church of God in Christ organization. [136]


Historian & Archivist

On September 1991 in Omaha, Nebraska, Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford and several members of the General Board held a press conference with the media. Ford stated quoted by the Omaha World Herald Newspaper, "Omaha can do more to bring us back to where we want to go than any other city in America that's because the (church's) roots are so deeply planted and woven together here." He stated this fact was because Omaha was home to Lizzie Robinson who Ford said was one of the church's "pioneering ladies, and he stated Robinson helped the denomination's founder Bishop Charles H. Mason organize and structure the church." [96]
It was after this time that the Bishop of Nebraska Vernon Richardson appointed Elder Elijah Hill as State Cultural Anthropologist of Nebraska to develop a plan to research and preserve the legacy of Mother Lizzie Robinson who lived in Omaha, Nebraska, she was the first General Supervisor appointed by the Founder of the Church of God in Christ in 1911.In 1991, Bishop Vernon Richardson was the first local Bishop in the history of the Church of God in Christ to personally appoint a historian for his jurisdiction, and Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford was the first Presiding Bishop to authorize and officially acknowledge Elder Elijah L. Hill to investigate and research the history of the Church of God in Christ.  [97]

Author of Books and Historical Video Documentaries

Elder Elijah Hill from his hours of cultural anthropological findings and archives was able to contribute several historical books for the Church of God in Christ.

He has authored and published ten books on different topics on the Bible. Here is the Amazon link: [159]